O'Grady's PowerPage » iOS

Apple offers iTunes credit for qualifying customers who purchased iWork apps after September 1st

Posted by:
Date: Monday, October 14th, 2013, 05:47
Category: News, retail, Software

If you bought Apple’s iWork apps recently, you may have a refund en route.

Per The Unofficial Apple Weblog and 9to5Mac, Apple will be offering credits to customers who purchased these apps after September 12th of this year. When Apple first introduced the iPhone 5s and 5c on September 12, they concurrently announced that new iOS device owners would be able to download Apple’s suite of mobile iWork apps along with most iLife apps for free. Taken together, the free apps would otherwise cost US$40.


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Apple on Friday began sending out emails to eligible consumers indicating that iOS users who purchased iWork or iLife apps as early as September 1 will be eligible for iTunes credits in the amount they paid.

The e-mail reads as follows:

“Dear iTunes Customer,

On September 10, 2013, Apple announced that iPhoto, iMovie, Keynote, Pages, and Numbers iOS apps are now available as a free download on the App Store for qualifying iOS 7 compatible devices activated on or after September 1, 2013.

Our records indicate that you purchased one or more of these apps on or after September 1, 2013 so we have provided you with the iTunes code below in the amount of US$5.34. This credit can be used towards the purchase of any content on the iTunes Store, App Store, or iBooks Store.

Detailed instructions for redeeming the code can be found at http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1574. Code: [redacted]

Thank you and we hope you enjoy using this credit towards your next purchase on iTunes.

Regards,

iTunes Customer Support iTunes Support”

So, if you bought the iWork apps after September 1st, keep your eyes peeled for the e-mail and let us know how it went in the comments section.

Adobe Flash Player updated to 11.9.900.117

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, October 9th, 2013, 06:06
Category: News, Software

This one’s fairly substantial.

On Tuesday, Adobe released Flash Player 11.9.900.117 for Mac OS X, an 18 megabyte download via MacUpdate. The new version adds the following fixes and changes:
- Mobile Workers (concurrency) – Android: Workers APIs are now supported for Android. This will work only with swf-version 22 (namespace 3.9) or later. The feature is in development and there are a few known issues.

- Support for background execution in Direct render mode – iOS and Android: Presently AIR on iOS and Android does not support background execution when render mode direct is set. Due to this restriction, Stage3D based apps are not able to execute background tasks like audio playback, location updates, network upload/download etc. iOS does not allow OpenGLES/rendering calls in the background. Applications which attempt to make OpenGL calls in the background are terminated by the iOS. Android does not restrict applications from either making OpenGLES in the background or other background task (like audio playback). With this feature, we would be allowing AIR mobile apps to execute in background when renderMode direct is set. AIR iOS runtime will throw an error if OpenGLES calls are made in background. However no error will be thrown on Android, as Android native apps are allowed to make OpenGLES calls in background. It’s recommended to not make rendering calls while app is executing in background as its important to utilize the mobile resources judicially. List of Stage APIs which may throw the error 3768 – The Stage3D API may not be used during background execution”.

- XXHDPI (144×144) Icon Support – Android: With this feature we have added support for beautiful, high resolution icons on devices such as the Nexus 10.

- Mac OS X 10.9 Support: We have tested against the latest developer releases of OS X 10.9 and are ensuring that Flash Player continues to perform as expected.

- Mac .pkg Installation Support: Deploying Flash Player and keeping it up to date is a critical task for system administrators worldwide. We’re introducing a new .pkg installer format for our distribution partners so we can reduce their workload by allowing them to deploy Flash Player for Mac using their current tools and environments.

Adobe Flash Player 11.9.900.117 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new Flash Player and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Skype for iPhone, iPad updated to 4.13, receives iOS 7 UI overhaul, other fixes

Posted by:
Date: Monday, October 7th, 2013, 07:51
Category: iOS, iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, News, Software

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On Monday, Skype released version 4.10 of its iOS app.

According to 9to5Mac, the new version includes the following fixes and changes:
- Refreshed look and feel for iOS 7.

Accessibility improvements, including:
- Improved accessibility of dialpad with touchtype support.

- VoiceOver announces the senders name when messaging.

- VoiceOver improvements for group chats.

- General fixes

The update, available as a free download from iTunes, requires iOS 5.0 or later to install and run and is suitable for all iPhones from the 3GS onward as well as all iPads and iPod Touches from 3rd Gen up.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, let us know in the comments.

Apple confirms purchase of Cue, has yet to disclose final sale price

Posted by:
Date: Friday, October 4th, 2013, 07:04
Category: Finance, News, Software

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It’s hard to say exactly WHAT Apple will do with Cue, but there’s some interesting possibilities.

Per AppleInsider and TechCrunch, Apple is said to have purchased Cue, a startup company behind a personal assistant app for iPhone which shut down just this week.

An anonymous source claimed on Thursday that Apple is buying Cue, which was formerly known as Greplin, for between US$50 million and US$60 million. The startup was a Y Combinator venture capital alumnus that reportedly obtained funding from both Sequoia Capital and Index Ventures.

The source shared that although Cue never disclosed their latest funding round, the company allegedly raised US$10 million from Index Ventures. The information provided could not be independently verified, and Apple declined to comment.

As of Thursday, Apple affirmed the acquisition, but as usual declined to offer specifics. Cue’s functionality was much like that of Google Now or Apple’s new iOS 7 contextual notifications, though it debuted before both of those services.

Cue announced to its users on Tuesday that the service is shutting down and is no longer available. Cue Premium users who bought a paid subscription, either through official iOS app or the company’s website, will receive a prorated refund.

“We apologize for any inconvenience this might cause you,” the company said. “It’s been an incredible journey that wouldn’t have been possible without your loyal support.”

Cue’s functionality was much like that of Google Now or Apple’s new iOS 7 contextual notifications, though it debuted before both of those services.

Originally founded as “Greplin”, the company would index content from social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, as well as pulling data from Gmail. For example, a single search for “Jim” would surface contacts from the user’s LinkedIn account, emails from Gmail, and documents from Dropbox.

The company transitioned in 2012 to become Cue, and offered a personal assistant application for Apple’s iOS that would automatically turn data such as flight or restaurant reservations into a daily agenda. Cue would accomplish this by collating and indexing a user’s contacts, files, and emails, then display important and timely information. The company was founded by entrepreneurs Daniel Gross and Robby Walker.

Cue was formerly run by Greg McAdoo, who was also previously associated with Bump, a company acquired by Google earlier this year for at least US$30 million. McAdoo has since moved on to become a venture capitalist at Sequoia Capital.

There’s no word as to how Apple will incorporate Cue’s technologies, but it’s another part of the company’s arsenal for somewhere down the road.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Netflix app updated to version 5.0, adds HD video, AirPlay streaming

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, October 3rd, 2013, 07:32
Category: iOS, News, Software

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The Netflix app you’re pretty fond of just got another hefty bump.

Per The Unofficial Apple Weblog, Netflix has released version 5.0 of its iOS app that adds some much-requested features for iOS 7 users. The first feature is HD video. Customers can now watch HD video just like Android users have been doing for months.

But the biggest new feature is AirPlay streaming. Now users don’t have to rely on AirPlay mirroring to watch Netflix videos on their Apple TV (or the actual Apple TV Netflix app). Users can simply use Netflix on the iPhone or iPad to select a movie and watch it on their Apple TV. This means they don’t need to keep the Netflix app open on their iOS device like they would have to with AirPlay mirroring.

Netflix 5.0 is available for free and requires iOS 7 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Apple confirms iOS 7 iMessages bug, states that fix is on the way

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013, 07:14
Category: iOS, iPhone, News, Software

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Where your iOS 7 and iMessage bugs are concerned, a fix may be on the way.

Per AppleInsider and the Wall Street Journal, Apple on Tuesday said it was aware of an issue a number of iPhone users have been experiencing with iMessage since upgrading to iOS 7, noting that a fix is coming soon to patch the problem.

The company told The Wall Street Journal in a statement that it is aware of an apparent iMessage glitch in which some users’ messages go unsent, unreceived or sent as a text. The problem appears to affect a variety of iPhone models running iOS 7.

Apple has released the following statement:
“We are aware of an issue that affects a fraction of a percent of our iMessage users, and we will have a fix available in an upcoming software update. In the meantime, we encourage any users having problems to reference our troubleshooting documents or contact AppleCare to help resolve their issue. We apologize for any inconvenience this causes impacted users.”

Since Apple released iOS 7 on Sept. 18, a number of threads pertaining to the issue have been created on Apple’s Support Communities webpage, the earliest of which dates back to launch day. The frequency of posts has increased, however, especially since the last iOS 7.0.2 update went live last week.

For many users, the following procedure seems to have worked in the short term:
Disable iMessage in Settings -> Messages,

Reset the iPhone’s Network Settings under Settings -> General -> Reset

Reenable iMessage.

While the method worked, and continues to work, for most iPhone owners afflicted with the iMessage bug, some have reported that the message failures reappeared after a few hours, forcing them to repeat the steps above.

Apple did not make clear when it plans to roll out the patch, though reports on Tuesday claimed a third iOS 7 update, dubbed iOS 7.0.3, has been distributed to employees and select partners.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Rumor: Apple to release iOS 7.0.3 update, tackle assorted bugs, next week

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, October 1st, 2013, 13:05
Category: iOS, iPhone, Rumor, Software

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To quote the classic “Aliens”: “Is this going to be a stand up fight, sir, or just another bug hunt?”

Per Boy Genius Report, Apple is rumored to roll out another minor update to iOS 7 next week, addressing several small and lingering issues in the company’s latest mobile operating system.

The iOS 7.0.3 update has been released to employees and select external partners for testing according to the article. The new version is said to be made available in advance of iOS 7.1′s expected reveal alongside new iPads at Apple’s rumored October event.

The new build may address performance issues that have lingered since iOS 7′s debut last month as well as new lock screen bypass security concerns that have surfaced since last week’s iOS 7.0.2 release. For comparison, iOS 7.0.2 carries build number 11A501.

The same site incorrectly claimed that Apple would release a seventh beta of iOS 7 in August. Apple instead skipped from iOS beta 6 to iOS 7 Golden Master on Sept. 10.

Apple released iOS 7.0.1 with “bug fixes and improvements” as an over-the-air update for the iPhone 5s and 5c on the handsets’ launch day, with iOS 7.0.2 following just six days later to address bugs related to lockscreen passcode security.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Some iOS 7 users report iMessage bug, temporary workaround discovered

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, October 1st, 2013, 07:21
Category: iOS, News, Software

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Well, this is why they invented bug fixes…

Per AppleInsider and multiple reports on Apple’s Support Communities webpage, a number iPhone owners who recently upgraded to iOS 7 are experiencing issues with iMessage, though a simple software reset may resolve the problem, at least temporarily.

The users have reported an apparent iMessage bug that is causing messages to go unsent, unreceived or sent as a text on a variety of iPhones models running iOS 7. Others complain that iMessages are not being converted to SMS texts, as would be the case if Apple’s servers were down, and are simply not being sent.

Some threads date back to Sept. 18, when Apple released the latest iOS to the public, though posts regarding the perceived issue have become increasingly frequent since the most recent iOS 7.0.2 update went live last week.

Support Communities forum members may have discovered a solution, however. Users are finding success with the following procedure: disable iMessage in Settings -> Messages, reset the iPhone’s Network Settings under Settings -> General -> Reset, then reenable iMessage. The method was also reported to be successful, at least in the short term.

There are variations on the method that include shutting down the handset for three to five minutes, though the technique has seen mixed results.

It is unclear how widespread the iMessage problem is at this point in time.

The purported iMessage troubles are the latest in a string of minor bugs users have reported following Apple’s launch of iOS 7 less than two weeks ago. The company subsequently pushed out two updates, the first being a day-one patch that dealt with the iPhone 5s’ Touch ID sensor, while the second squashed a lock screen passcode bypass bug.

If you’ve seen the issue on your end, please let us know in the comments.

Apple releases iOS 7.0.2 update, fixes Lock Screen vulnerability

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, September 26th, 2013, 12:43
Category: iOS, iPad, iPad mini, iPhone, iPod Touch, News, security, Software

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It got some negative attention and now it’s got a fix.

On Thursday, Apple released iOS 7.0.2, an updated new version of its operating system for its iPhone, iPad and iPod touch devices. The new operating system, which weighs in as a several hundred megabyte download, offers the following fixes and changes:
- Fixes bugs that could allow someone to bypass the Lock screen passcode.

- Reintroduces a Greek keyboard option for passcode entry.

iOS 7.0.2 is available via iTunes or Over-The-Air updating and requires an iPhone 4, 4S, 5, iPad 2, third or fourth-gen iPad, iPod Touch 4th Gen or iPad Mini to install and run.

If you’ve tried the updates and have any feedback to offer, let us know in the comments.

Opinion: A New Personal Computing Paradigm

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, September 24th, 2013, 07:50
Category: iOS, iPad, iPad mini, iPhone, Opinion

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By Robert Snow

How soon before most personal computing can be done with a phone? With a 64-bit iPhone, perhaps quite soon. Imagine the phone as your take everywhere computer:

“Never”, you say, the screen’s too small, even a phablet. When you need a better display, just pull out your touchscreen. It would look like an iPad or iPad Mini only thinner, lighter and cheaper. No CPU or storage. It would connect to your phone via Wi-fi and act as a display and touchscreen input device with a camera, microphone and speaker. It would be indistinguishable from an iPad, so long as your phone is nearby and turned on. Apple is almost there with AirPlay.

Let’s say you do a lot of writing, then you would have a screen with hinged keyboard and trackpad. It would look like a MacBook Air only thinner, lighter and cheaper. Again, no CPU or storage. iOS would recognize the device and work more like OS X. This would require some additional code for iOS. Call it “iOS X”. This would require 64 bits, no question.

Go to work where they have BYOD. On your desk, you would have a display, keyboard and mouse that looked just like an iMac. Again, iOS would need to recognize the larger display, keyboard and mouse and scale up. Imagine an iPhone 6s sporting a processor that is truly “Desktop Class”.

A future iPhone and iOS working this way could dominate the enterprise. Security would be awesome. Your desktop computer would cease to be a computer once you leave work with your phone. Laptop or tablet stolen, no security issues. Of course, the phone is secured by Touch ID and a new phone could be issued and restored from an online backup in no time. Only one computing and communications device per employee. Personal computing could not be more personal. No synchronizing devices. Minimal IT support. Lower cost.

Cloud storage and larger onboard memory would be key to this working.No more costs associated with deploying Microsoft Office or maintaining complicated desktop and laptop operating systems.There would still be a market for powerful desktop and laptop computers, but most employees would simply need a phone as their computer and some specialized input/output device mimicking a tablet, laptop or desktop computer. The phone would of course remain an expensive high-end phone. The upgrade cycle would be brilliant, keep your old IO devices and get a new desktop or laptop computer every two years by simply standing in line for the latest and greatest iPhone, subsidized by your carrier. Apple does make most of its profit on phones and this will sell more of them.

Sure, it would cannibalize iPad and Mac sales by growing a market for these IO devices and not just for the enterprise. Kids, grandparents and folks who just don’t need serious computing power could simplify their life by augmenting their colorful consumer phone with one of these devices. Consumer versions that are even cheaper and clad in plastic. If you need a phone right now, get a smart phone and you no longer need a camera, music player or GPS device. Get an iPhone in a year or two and you will no longer need a tablet, a laptop or a desktop computer. Wearable computing, no problem. Dumb down iOS for a tiny screen and just a few buttons.

A post-PC world on steroids.

One more thing: Home entertainment and in-car entertainment.

Same paradigm and one more reason to buy an iPhone.