Happy Fourth of July from the PowerPage!!!

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Date: Monday, July 4th, 2011, 03:10
Category: Announcement

Happy Fourth of July from O’Grady’s PowerPage, where the staff will be taking the day off to celebrate the holiday, grab some tasty barbecue and spend time with friends and family prior to watching rather large (and nifty) explosions in the sky tonight.

We’ll be back tomorrow with additional Mac and iOS mobile technology coverage, so enjoy the holiday and Happy Fourth, wherever you may be!!!

Apple releases Mac OS X 10.7 gold master to developer community, upgrade due this month

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Date: Friday, July 1st, 2011, 10:40
Category: News, Software

As July begins, Mac OS X 10.7 (“Lion”) is due to hit this month and as of Friday, Apple has released Lion’s Gold Master (GM) seed to developers.

Per Macworld, The GM release traditionally signals the last major internal update before the release to the general public; save any major issues, this version (labeled build number 11A511) of Lion should be the one consumers will see later this month.

Lion still has no official release date from Apple beyond the nebulous “July”, but we’ll keep you informed as to any news or changes as they become available.


Initial tests show promising Thunderbolt speeds, ability to boot off new port

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Date: Thursday, June 30th, 2011, 04:26
Category: Hardware, News

A newly published series of test results from the cool cats at AnandTech shows Apple’s newly adopted Thunderbolt technology blows FireWire 800 out of the water with data transfer speeds to an external RAID system at 700MB/s.

After the release of Apple’s Thunderbolt cable on Tuesday, early impressions have begun to surface on the Web. The AnandTech staff got their hands on both the US$49 cable and the US$1,999 Promise Pegasus R6 system and have subsequently stated that they are able to write to the 12TB RAID array at nearly 700MB/s while on a notebook. The speed obliterated that of the commonplace USB 2.0, as well as FireWire 800.

In his testing, Anand Shimpi also revealed via Twitter that external drives can be booted from via Thunderbolt. This makes it possible to have a full install of OS X, which includes all your files and apps, stored on a Thunderbolt external drive. This in turn would allow you to take your computer everywhere you go, and run it on another Thunderbolt-equipped Mac.

Per Macworld’s test of the new cable with the same RAID system, their detailed results show Thunderbolt is between 4 and 21 times faster than FireWire & USB 2.0. When compared to both on a 2.2GHz Core i5 Macbook Pro, Thunderbolt could write a 2GB file at 210.5 MBps.

On the other hand, USB 2.0 could only stretch to 29.7 MBps, a result that is 7.09 times slower. FireWire 400 could write the file at 30.2MBps, 6.97 times slower & FireWire 800 wrote the file at 47MBps, or 4.47 times slower.

Also Tuesday, Apple issued a series of 10 questions and answers related to Thunderbolt. Most of the information presented was already announced, like the fact that the cable offers two independent channels of 10GBit/s.

One new bit of information from the series of answers is a possible drawback for high-end Macbook Pro users: A PCI Express Card in the Express Card slot cannot be operated if the system is connected to a Thunderbolt device. Apple recommends disconnecting the device if you are going to use the Express Slot.

The full list of info is included below:

1. What is the maximum bandwidth supported by Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt cable (2 m)?

Thunderbolt utilizes two separate 10Gbps links—one for displays and one for PCI-E device trafffic—for throughput of up to 10 Gbps between Thunderbolt capable devices and your Mac. Some devices not made by Apple may support different bandwidth rates; consult any documentation that came with your Thunderbolt-enabled device for information specific to your device. Choose the Disk Activity tab in Activity Monitor to read current disk activity statistics, which may be helpful to determine disk activity with storage devices using Thunderbolt. Some storage devices may have a maximum transfer rate lower than the bandwidth potential of Thunderbolt.

2. What is the proper way to insert a Thunderbolt cable into my Thunderbolt-capable device or Mac?

The Thunderbolt symbol should be on the top of the connector. You can plug either end of the cable into a device or Mac; the connectors on each end are the same. Do not force the Thunderbolt cable into your Thunderbolt-capable device or Mac computer’s Thunderbolt port.

3. How do I confirm a Thunderbolt-enabled device is connected to a Mac?

Open System Profiler and examine the Thunderbolt tab for a list of any connected Thunderbolt devices.

4. Can I use a Thunderbolt cable to connect a Promise, La Cie, or other third-party storage device that uses Thunderbolt?

Yes. You can use a Thunderbolt cable to connect any Thunderbolt-enabled device or Mac.

5. Is there a maximum supported length for using Thunderbolt cables with Apple products?

Thunderbolt cables should not exceed two meters for maximum performance. Apple Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt cable (2 m) is two meters in length. Some Thunderbolt devices include an extra port you can use to connect other Thunderbolt devices downstream with additional Thunderbolt cables.

6. Why is there a black screen when I use a Thunderbolt cable to connect to an Intel-based iMac that supports Target Display Mode?

Although a Thunderbolt cable will fit into Mini DisplayPort connections, only Mini DisplayPort cables can be used to in Target Display Mode with an iMac (Late 2009) or iMac (Mid 2010) connected to a Thunderbolt-enabled Mac; iMac models produced before 2011 do not support Thunderbolt cables or devices. If you have an iMac (Late 2009), make sure you have the 27-inch SMC iMac Firmware Update 1.0 installed to avoid issues waking from sleep in Target Display Mode.

7. What do I do if my Mac doesn’t have a Thunderbolt option in System Profiler and no connected devices seem to be recognized?

For Mac computers with Thunderbolt, run Software Update to install any available updates to use Thunderbolt devices with your Mac.

8. I’ve installed all available updates, but no Thunderbolt devices are recognized when I connect them with Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt cable (2 m).

Try using a different a Thunderbolt cable, using a Mini DisplayPort cable, or—in the case of a storage device—try using another supported connection method, such as USB or FireWire.

9. Can I use Target Disk Mode with a Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt cable (2 m) and a third-party storage device that uses Thunderbolt?

Yes. The Thunderbolt logo should appear with the FireWire logo when you start up a Thunderbolt-enabled Mac and have a Thunderbolt storage device connected. If you have both a Thunderbolt and a FireWire storage device connected and enter Target Disk Mode, the Thunderbolt-enabled device will be the default. If you disconnect either a Thunderbolt or FireWire storage device after successfully entering Target Disk Mode, the corresponding icon should disappear from the display.

10. Can I use Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt cable (2 m) with supported versions of Microsoft Windows on a Thunderbolt-capable Mac with Boot Camp?

Yes. Learn more about using Thunderbolt with your Mac running Windows with Boot Camp.

If you’ve played with the new Thunderbolt port or have any comments, please let us know.

Parallels Desktop 6.0.12090.660720 released

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Date: Wednesday, June 29th, 2011, 14:02
Category: News, Software

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Parallels Desktop, the popular virtualization application that allows users to run the Windows and Linux operating systems simultaneously alongside Mac OS X, reached version 6.0.12090.660720 on Wednesday. The new version, a 211 megabyte download, available here and includes the following major fixes and changes:

- Improves compatibility with Mac OS X 10.6.8.

- Resolves an issue with Finder and the Dock being unresponsive while working with icons larger than 128×128 px created by Parallels Desktop.

Parallels Desktop 6 for Mac retails for US$79.99 and requires Mac OS X 10.5.2 later to install and run.

Apple releases Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 10, Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 5

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Date: Wednesday, June 29th, 2011, 03:14
Category: News, Software

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Late Tuesday, Apple released a pair of Java updates for its Mac OS X 10.5 and 10.6 operating systems. The updates (Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 10 and Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 5) make the same changes and per Macworld, offer “improved compatibility, security, and reliability.” The specifics on how the updates do this are unclear, however, as the release notes for both the 10.6 and 10.5 updates are a little light on the details.

Both updates are available via direct download from their respective web sites or via Mac OS X’s Software Update feature.

The updates require Mac OS X 10.5.8 and Mac OS X 10.6.4 to install and run, respectively.

If you’ve tried the updates and have any feedback to offer, please let us know.

Apple releases Thunderbolt Firmware Update 1.0

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Date: Tuesday, June 28th, 2011, 03:10
Category: News, Software

Late Monday, Apple released Thunderbolt Firmware Update 1.0, a 486 KB download focused on providing stability and performance fixes for Mac with the new Thunderbolt port. The update will restart your Mac with a gray screen a status bar to indicate the progress of the update.

While the update is taking place, do not disturb or shut off the power on your computer during this update.

The update is also available via Mac OS X’s Software Update feature and requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6.7 or later to install and run.

VirtualBox updated to 4.0.10

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Date: Tuesday, June 28th, 2011, 03:44
Category: News, Software

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VirtualBox, an open source x86 virtualization project available for free has just hit version 4.0.10. The new version, a 82.8 megabyte download, sports the following list of fixes and changes:

- GUI: fixed disappearing settings widgets on KDE hosts (bug #6809).

- Storage: fixed hang under rare circumstances with flat VMDK images.

- Storage: a saved VM could not be restored under certain circumstances after the host kernel was updated (bug #8983).

- Storage: refuse to create a medium with an invalid variant (for example Split2G with VDI; bug #7227).

- Snapshots: none of the hard disk attachments must be attached to another VM in normal mode when creating a snapshot.

- USB: fixed occasional VM hangs with SMP guests (bug #4580).

- USB: proper device detection on RHEL/OEL/CentOS 5 guests (partial fix for bug #8978).

- ACPI: force the ACPI timer to return monotonic values for improve behavior with SMP Linux guests (bug #8511 and others).

- RDP: fixed screen corruption under rare circumstances (bug #8977).

- rdesktop-vrdp: updated to version 1.7.0.

- OVF: under rare circumstances some data at the end of a VMDK file was not written during export.

- Lion fixes (bug #8903).

- GNOME 3 fix.

VirtualBox 4.0.10 is available for free and requires Mac OS X 10.4 or later and an Intel-based Mac to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback, please let us know.

Best Buy puts hold on MacBook Air orders, next-gen units expected soon

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Date: Monday, June 27th, 2011, 04:58
Category: MacBook Air, News

National retailer Best Buy has put a hold on online MacBook Air orders, providing further evidence that Apple plans to release an updated version of its diminutive laptop.

Per Electronista, Best Buy’s listings for the current-generation MacBook Air are now listed as “Not Available for Shipping.” Meanwhile, all MacBook Air models on Apple’s Online Store remain ready for shipping.

Best Buy continues to offer the portables in its brick-and-mortar retail stores, though some locations have reportedly run out of stock. In the U.K., the big-box retailer allows orders for a MacBook Air with 128GB of storage, but only with in-store pickup at certain locations.

Apple is expected to refresh the MacBook Air line with Intel’s Sandy Bridge processors and the addition of the Thunderbolt port. However, sources close to the story have stated that Apple is waiting until it can load a Gold Master build of Mac OS X Lion onto the notebooks before releasing them.

Mac OS X Lion is due for release on the Mac App Store in July. As a major upgrade to Apple’s flagship desktop OS, Lion will include more than 250 new features such as full screen apps, additional multi-touch gestures and Mission Control.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple releases Security Update 2011-004

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Date: Friday, June 24th, 2011, 08:23
Category: News, Software

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Along with yesterday’s Mac OS X 10.6.8 update, Apple also released Security Update 2011-004, which brings some of the same patches to Mac OS X 10.5 (“Leopard”), as well as fixing some Leopard-specific security bugs.

Per Macworld, the update patched 28 bugs in systems ranging from AirPort to MobileMe, QuickTime, and subversion. While many of the bugs fixed in Leopard have been addressed in previous updates to Snow Leopard, a handful affect both versions of the OS; Apple’s Knowledge Base document also addresses some Snow Leopard-specific bugs patched in Mac OS X 10.6.8.

The one thing Leopard doesn’t benefit from is Snow Leopard’s malware detection system, which was updated in 10.6.8 to catch more versions of the Mac Defender Trojan horse. Leopard users will instead have to rely on a combination of third-party antivirus software and common sense to defend themselves from the malware.

Security Update 2011-004 is recommended for all users of Mac OS X 10.5, and requires Mac OS X 10.5.8 or later to install and run. For users of the OS’s client version, a 256.4MB download is available via Software Update or the support section of Apple’s web site; Leopard Server users can download a 499.8MB update via Software Update or Apple’s site.

If you’ve tried the security update and have any feedback about it, let us know.

Roxio Toast Titanium 11.0.3 update released

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Date: Friday, June 24th, 2011, 03:13
Category: News, Software

Late Thursday, Roxio released version 11.0.3 of its Toast Titanium authoring software. The new version, available here, adds the following fixes and changes:

- Resolves an issue where unexpected beahviour occurs when working with VIDEO_TS folders authored by a specific application.

- Resolves an issue where adding MKV video with MPEG-2 content may cause a crash.

- Only valid start and end times are accepted in the Edit Video window.

- Custom audio transition now accepts user specified duration correctly.

- Verification will now occur when copying when burning disc-to-disc.

- Resolves an issue where some High Definition DVD projects and Blu-ray projects may hang at 99% of completion.

Toast Titanium 11 requires Mac OS X 10.5 or later to install and run and retails for US$79.99.

If you’ve tried the new update and noticed any changes, please let us know in the comments.