Onyx 2.3.0 released

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Date: Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011, 04:04
Category: News, Software

onyxicon

Onyx, Titanium Software’s popular freeware multifunction utility for Mac OS X, has been updated to version 2.3.0. The new version, a 18.8 megabyte download (courtesy of MacUpdate), adds the following fixes and changes:

- Bug while deleting the Safari cookies corrected.

- Some little improvements.

Onyx 2.3.0 requires Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run.

Adobe announce Edge 1.0 HTML 5 creation tool, offers preview for free

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Date: Monday, August 1st, 2011, 05:27
Category: News, Software

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Sometimes you have to transition to the next thing.

Per Adobe’s blog, Adobe has released a free public preview of Edge, a new motion and interaction design tool that lets users build Flash-style animated Web content using HTML, JavaScript, and CSS.

Edge is planned for commercial release sometime next year and is designed to work in concert with the company’s existing professional design tools—Dreamweaver CS5.5, Flash Professional CS5.5, and Flash Builder 4.5 (as well as earlier versions)—is targeted to designers seeking an efficient way to use Web standards like HTML to create content featuring motion and transitions.

The application works natively with HTML and lets users add motion to existing HTML documents without altering the design or CSS-based layout. Users can also import standard Web graphics such as SVG, PNG, JPG, and GIF files and style them using CSS3. It also lets users create visually rich content from scratch with familiar drawing tools that produce HTML elements styled with CSS3.

The design stage (the workspace in Edge) uses WebKit to enable content design, preview, and manipulation. The timeline offers advanced techniques to boost productivity and precision in creating animations, and lets users define and customize motion applied to HTML elements, Adobe says.

Content created with Edge is designed to work on browsers such as Safari, Chrome, and Firefox. Edge content can also be viewed on mobile devices running iOS, Android, BlackBerry Playbook, and HP webOS.

Adobe Edge is immediately available worldwide for Mac and Windows and requires Mac OS X 10.6 or 10.7 or later to install and run the application.

Security researcher to illustrate MacBook batteries’ vulnerabilities to malware

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Date: Monday, July 25th, 2011, 04:19
Category: battery, News, security

In the category of “weird but interesting and mildly disturbing”, a prominent security researcher has discovered a vulnerability in the batteries of Apple’s MacBook line of portable computers that could allow hackers to ruin the batteries or install malware on them that could corrupt a Mac.

Per Forbes, Charlie Miller, a renowned white-hat hacker who works for security firm Accuvant, plans to reveal and offer a fix next month for a MacBook battery vulnerability he has discovered. Miller uncovered default passwords, which are used to access the microcontroller in Apple’s batteries, within a firmware update from 2009 and used them to gain access to the firmware.

Apple and other laptop makers use embedded chips in their lithium ion laptop batteries to monitor its power level, stop and start charging and regulate heat.

During the course of his tests, the researcher “bricked” seven batteries, rendering them unusable by rewriting the firmware. Of more concern is the possibility that hackers could use the vulnerability to install difficult to remove malware, or, in a worst case scenario, cause the batteries to explode.

“These batteries just aren’t designed with the idea that people will mess with them,” he said. “What I’m showing is that it’s possible to use them to do something really bad.” According to him, few IT administrators would think to check the battery, providing hackers with an opportunity to hide malicious software on a battery that could repeatedly implant itself on a computer.

Miller admitted that he hasn’t tried to blow up any batteries, but he did say it might be possible. “You read stories about batteries in electronic devices that blow up without any interference,” he noted. “If you have all this control, you can probably do it.”

Another researcher, Barnaby Jack, who works for antivirus software maker McAfee, also looked into the battery issue a couple years ago, but said he didn’t get as far as Miller did.

Miller, who is a regular winner of security contests demonstrating Mac, Safari and iPhone exploits, has notified Apple and Texas Instruments of the issue. Despite requests from several other researchers not to proceed, he plans to unveil the vulnerability, along with a fix he calls “Caulkgun,” at the Black Hat security conference next month.

“Caulk Gun” will change a battery’s default passwords to a random string of characters. While the fix will prevent hackers from breaking into the battery, it would also block any future firmware updates from Apple.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple releases Safari 5.1 update

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Date: Wednesday, July 20th, 2011, 07:29
Category: News, Software

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Amidst all the Mac OS X 10.7 Lion/brand-new-MacBook Air-with-Thunderbolt-and-Sandy-Bridge hubbub, Apple also released Safari 5.1, an update to its web browser. The new version, a 47.5 megabyte download, includes the following fixes and new features:

- Reading List: Easily add webpages and links to your Reading List to browse when you have time.

- New Process Architecture: Safari has been re-engineered for improved stability and responsiveness.

- Resume: In the General pane of Safari preferences, you can now choose to launch Safari with the windows from your last browsing session.

- Better Privacy: A new Privacy pane in Safari preferences makes it easy to remove data that websites can leave on your system.

Other improvements include:
- Private AutoFill: Safari lets you fill out forms quickly while keeping your personal information private.

- Find Option: When you use Find, you can choose whether you want to search for text that contains or starts with the text that you type in the search field.

- Drag-and-drop Downloads: You can drag items out of the Downloads window in Safari, so you can easily place downloaded files on the Desktop.

- Advanced Web Technologies: Safari introduces support for full-screen webpages, media caching with the HTML5 application cache, MathML, Web Open Font Format, CSS3 Auto-hyphenation, CSS3 Vertical Text, CSS3 Text Emphasis, Window.onError, and Formatted XML files.

- New Extension APIs: Developers can take advantage of new Safari Extension support for popovers, menus, new event classes, and interaction with Reader.

Safari 5.1 is available on Mac OS X via Software Update or via direct download from Apple and requires Mac OS X 10.6.8 or later to install and run.

New “MAC Defender” malware variant surfaces, works way around recent security update

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Date: Thursday, June 2nd, 2011, 04:10
Category: News, security, Software

Only one day after Apple released a security update for Mac OS X to address the “MAC Defender” malware, a new variant of the bogus antivirus software has been spotted in the wild.

Per ZDNet, the new variation of MAC Defender, named “Mdinstall.pkg,” has been crafted to bypass the new malware-blocking code made available by Apple. That update for Mac OS X, Security Update 2011-003, was released on Tuesday.

“The file has a date and time stamp from last night at 9:24PM Pacific time,” Bott wrote. That’s less than 8 hours after Apple’s security update was released. On a test system using Safari with default settings, it behaved exactly as before, beginning the installation process with no password required.

“As PC virus experts know, this cat-and-mouse game can go on indefinitely. Your move, Apple.”

Security Update 2011-003 included changes to the File Quarantine feature found in Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard. It includes anti-malware definitions within the operating system itself, and examines external files downloaded within Mail, iChat, Safari, or other quarantine-aware applications.

The MACDefender malware first gained attention in early May, when it was spotted by an antivirus company. The program automatically downloads in Web browsers through JavaScript and originally required users to enter an administrator password, but a more recent variant does not ask for a password.

Some reports have suggested that the “MAC Defender” malware has spread quickly, with Bott earlier citing an anonymous AppleCare representative that apparently said the “overwhelming majority” of recent calls to Apple were related to the malware. Last week, Apple posted instructions on its site informing users on how to remove the malware.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple releases Security Update 2011-003, removes Mac Defender malware

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Date: Wednesday, June 1st, 2011, 03:15
Category: News, security, Software

Beating the expected arrival date (the Mac OS X 10.6.8 update had been anticipated to take care of this), Apple has released Security Update 2011-003, which adds malware detection and removal for the “MAC Defender” scam and delivers a daily update mechanism for updating subsequent malware definitions.

Per AppleInsider, the 2.3 megabyte security update for Mac OS X 10.6.7 is available as a direct download or via Mac OS X’s Software Update feature. Installing the update does not require a system reboot.

The update adds malware discovery and removal for MAC Defender and all of its known variants, using the simple malware file quarantine feature that was first added to Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard.

The Mac OS X file quarantine feature examines external files downloaded within Mail, iChat, Safari or other file quarantine-aware applications, warning users of downloads that match the definition of malware.

In addition to adding a definition for the latest “MAC Defender” trojan horse to warn users that the download should be deleted, the new security update adds a daily malware definitions check to make subsequent malware attempts even easier for Apple to protect it users from.

Users can opt out of the daily malware definitions update check by unchecking the new “Automatically update safe downloads list” checkbox in Security Preferences.

If you’ve tried the update and have any feedback to offer, let us know.

New version of “Mac Defender” malware found, lacks administrator password requirement

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Date: Thursday, May 26th, 2011, 03:05
Category: News, security, Software

Somewhere, the guys who created this program really DO have a bridge to try and sell you…

Per security firm Intego, a new, more dangerous variant of “MAC Defender,” dubbed “Mac Guard,” has been discovered, the new malware variant lacking the requirement of an administrator password to install.

The discovery was announced on Wednesday, the company commenting that “the first part is a downloader, a tool that, after installation, downloads a payload from a web server,” the security firm said.

“As with the Mac Defender malware variants, this installation package, called avSetup.pkg, is downloaded automatically when a user visits a specially crafted web site,” the firm continued.

No administrator’s password is required to install the application, and if users have Safari’s “Open ‘safe’ files after downloading option checked, the package will open Apple’s Mac OS X installer, and users will see a standard installation screen. However, at this point users must still agree to install the “MAC Defender” malware.

The second part of the malware is a new version called “MacGuard.” The avRunner application automatically downloads “MacGuard,” which, like its predecessor, aims to trick users into providing credit card numbers in exchange for supposedly ridding a users’ systems of “infected” files for a given license fee.

This week, Apple posted a support document on its web site explaining how to remove the “MAC Defender” malware. The company also revealed it will release an update to its Mac OS X operating system that will automatically find and remove the malware.

Some reports have suggested that the “MAC Defender” malware has spread quickly, with one anonymous AppleCare representative claiming that the “overwhelming majority” of recent calls to Apple were related to the malware. The software was first discovered early this month, also by Intego.

While the original variant was categorized as a “low” threat because it requires users to type in an administrator password, the latest version is considered more dangerous, and was ranked with a “medium” risk.

The malware has spread through search engines like Google via a method known as “SEO poisoning.” Using this technique, phony sites are designed to game search engine algorithms and show up when users search for certain topics.

“MAC Defender” trojan goes live, prompts users for credit card information

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Date: Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011, 04:20
Category: News, security, Software

Security firm Intego announced Monday that a fake antivirus program for Mac OS X has been discovered in the wild. While the threat potential remains low, inexperienced users could be fooled into paying to remove fake viruses “detected” by the software, and in the process, could end up giving credit card information to scammers.

Per Ars Technica, the fake antivirus software calls itself “MAC Defender,” perhaps the first hint that it should not be trusted (Apple makes “Macs,” not “MACs”). The developers have incorporated what’s known as “SEO poisoning” to make links to the software show up at the top of search results in Google and other search engines. Clicking the links that show up in search results brings up a fake Windows screen that tells the user a virus has been “detected,” another clue that something is fishy. JavaScript code then automatically downloads a zipped installer for MAC Defender.

If the “Open ‘safe’ files after downloading” option is turned on in Safari, the installer will be unzipped and run. Since the installer requires a user password, it won’t install without user interaction. However, inexperienced users may be fooled into thinking the software is legitimate.

Intego notes that the application is visually well designed and doesn’t have numerous misspellings or other errors common to such malware on Windows, though it does seem to contain some sketchy grammar. The software will periodically display Growl alerts that various fake malware has been detected, and also periodically opens porn websites in the default browser, perhaps leading a user to believe the detected malware “threats” are real. Users are then directed to an insecure website to pay for a license and “clean” the malware infections. However, buying the license merely stops the fake alerts from popping up, but your money and credit card info is now in the hands of hackers.

While MAC Defender wouldn’t likely fool an experienced user, Intego notes that its appearance in the wild is yet another opportunity to detail some useful security precautions. Don’t let your browser automatically open downloads. If your browser asks if you want to run an installer even though you didn’t try to download one, click “cancel.” And never give your password to run installers you aren’t 100% sure about.

On a final note, if you or anyone you know happens to know who created this thing, feel free to kick them in the shins at your earliest convenience.

Onyx 2.2.6 released

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Date: Monday, April 4th, 2011, 04:30
Category: News, Software

onyxicon

Onyx, Titanium Software’s popular freeware multifunction utility for Mac OS X, has been updated to version 2.2.6. The new version, a 15.8 megabyte download (courtesy of MacUpdate), adds the following fixes and changes:

- Deleting Internet Cache improved.

- Deleting the Applications Cache improved.

- Deleting the Diagnostic Reports improved.

- New Safari option: “Enable/disable Safari’s image cache”.

- New Dock option: “Enable/disable the single application mode”.

Onyx 2.2.6 requires Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run.

Apple releases Mac OS X 10.6.7 update

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Date: Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011, 03:32
Category: News, Software

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Late Monday, Apple released Mac OS X 10.6.7, the most recent version of its Mac OS X 10.6 “Snow Leopard” operating system. The update, which alternates between 313 MB and 1.12 gigabytes for the combo update, offers the following fixes and changes:

- Improve the reliability of Back to My Mac.

- Resolve an issue when transferring files to certain SMB servers.

- Address various minor Mac App Store issues.

- Includes all the improvements in the previous Mac OS X v10.6.1, 10.6.2, 10.6.3, 10.6.4, 10.6.5, and 10.6.6 updates.

- Includes Safari 5.0.4.

- Includes RAW image compatibility for additional digital cameras.

- Resolves a window resizing issue with X-Plane 9 on Macs with ATI graphics

- Addresses an issue with MacBook Air (Mid 2010) computers that could cause a kernel panic.

- Address issues in the AirPort driver for certain devices.

- Improves brightness on external displays and projectors.

- Addresses an issue where DVD Player may display black video on some Macs using the 64-bit kernel.

- Addresses an issue with some NEC displays in which the screen may appear black when connected to a Mac Pro (Mid 2010).

- Resolves an issue in which some Multiple Master (MM) fonts were missing from Mac Pro (Mid 2010), MacBook Pro (15-inch & 17-inch Mid 2010), and iMac (Mid 2010) computers.

- Addresses various issues with MacBook Air (Mid 2010) computer performance.

- Resolves an issue in which clicking the Updates tab in the Mac App Store could cause the Mac App Store to become unresponsive.

- Fixes a problem opening an afp:// URL that points to a file, and changes the AFP mount path to conform to previous Mac OS X releases.

- Includes the ability to repair certain issues that may prevent hardware RAID volumes from mounting.

- Fixes a rare issue in Mac OS X v10.6.5 that could cause user accounts to disappear from the Login window and System Preferences after putting the system to sleep.

- Improves the reliability of dragging files or folders to the Trash when using an NFS home directory.

Mac OS X 10.6.7 can be directly downloaded here or via Mac OS X’s Software Update feature.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback, positive or negative, please let us know about your experience in the comments.