O'Grady's PowerPage » security

Apple releases OS X 10.10.2 update

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, January 27th, 2015, 17:55
Category: News, security, Software, Yosemite

yosemitelogo

You’ve been hankering for it.

And it’s here.

On Tuesday, Apple released its long-awaited OS X 10.10.2 update. The update, a 400+ megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:

- Resolves an issue that may cause Wi-Fi to disconnect.

- Resolves an issue that may cause web pages to load slowly.

- Fixes an issue that caused Spotlight to load remote email content when the preference was disabled in Mail.
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Analysts highlight extremely strong iPhone sales in China over last quarter

Posted by:
Date: Monday, January 26th, 2015, 17:04
Category: Finance, iPhone, News

iphone6shot

The Chinese marketplace apparently loves the iPhone 6.

Per MacRumors and Financial Times, according to analysts from financial firm UBS, China accounted for 36 percent of iPhone shipments in the most recent quarter, compared to 24 percent for the U.S. The analysts also compared the numbers to 2013, noting that a year before China accounted for only 22 percent of shipments with the U.S. at 29 percent.

Creative Strategies analyst Ben Bajarin concurs with the UBS report, believing around 2 million more iPhones were sold in China than in the U.S. during the quarter. With the upcoming launch of the Apple Watch, he also believes it’s just the beginning of the country’s fiscal dominance over Apple sales.

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Latest OS X 10.10.2 build features Google Project Zero discoveries/fixes

Posted by:
Date: Friday, January 23rd, 2015, 10:23
Category: News, security, Software

yosemitelogo

If Yosemite is driving you a bit crazy, the good news is that the upcoming version won’t feature any bugs that have been pinned down by Google.

Per iMore and Ars Technica, Google’s Project Zero research program has disclosed and released proof-of-concept code for a series of 0day — previously unknown — vulnerabilities found in Apple’s OS X operating system for the Mac. It should be noted, however, that the first vulnerability was marked as fixed and closed by Google two weeks ago, and the others are fixed in OS X Yosemite 10.10.2, now in beta.

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Edward Snowden refuses to use an iPhone, cites backdoors, security reasons

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, January 21st, 2015, 12:20
Category: Uncategorized

snowden

Edward Snowden doesn’t trust the iPhone.

Whether you trust yours is another matter altogether.

Per AppleInsider and Sputnik, infamous former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, responsible for leaking thousands of pages of classified intelligence documents from the secretive spy organization, reportedly believes that the iPhone contains “special software” that can be remotely activated by authorities for intelligence gathering purposes.

“Edward never uses an iPhone, he’s got a simple phone,” Snowden’s lawyer said in a recent interview. “The iPhone has special software that can activate itself without the owner, having to press a button and gather information about him, that’s why on security grounds he refused to have this phone.”

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Google releases Chrome Remote Desktop app for iOS, Android

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, January 14th, 2015, 18:17
Category: iOS, News, Software

chromeremotedesktop

This could come in handy.

On Wednesday, Google released its Chrome Remote Desktop app for iOS and Android.

The app, which connects mobile devices to Mac, Windows & Linux-based computers for desktop access, requires the Chrome web browser and application to install and run as well as a user-configured 6-digit PIN.

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Apple releases Network Time Protocol security patch

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014, 08:43
Category: News, security, Software

trojanhorse

It’s not a huge patch, but it could make a difference.

Per Mac|Life, Apple released a small Network Time Protocol security patch on Friday. The patch, a 1.4 megabyte download, addresses what the company terms as a new “critical security issue”.

Fascinatingly enough, the vulnerability itself was discovered by the Google Security Team back on December 19, and the U.S. Government alerted users of it only a couple of days later. The dangers of the vulnerability are a little complex and the government’s ICS-CERT site is a little vague about what it is and what it does:

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Apple releases iOS 8.1.2 update, includes ringtone purchase fix, security changes (updated)

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, December 9th, 2014, 13:44
Category: iOS, iPad, iPhone, iPod, News, security, Software

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This could come in handy.

Per 9to5Mac, Apple has released iOS 8.1.2 as an over-the-air software update for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch users running iOS 8. The latest release contains bug fixes for users as well as a fix for a problem regarding ringtones purchased from Apple being removed from devices. Other fixes include a fix for keyboards that may not appear in Safari, Maps, or other third-party apps in iOS simulator and it offers Siri support for Singapore English, Repairing a bug that caused Notifications to fail to open an app and a fix for an issue that caused WatchKit apps to stop working in iOS 8 simulator.

For users subject to the reported issues involving ringtones purchased through iTunes, Apple points users to itunes.com/restore-tones for recovering those purchases.

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Google Chrome for OS X goes 64-bit

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, November 20th, 2014, 16:40
Category: News, Software

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If you were hankering for a 64-bit version of Google Chrome for OS X, it’s finally arrived.

Safari has been 64-bit since OS X 10.6 (August 2009) and Firefox has been 64-bit since version 4 (2011). Incidentally, a 64-bit web browser is required to run Oracle Java on OS X.

Per Google’s Chrome Releases Blog, the Chrome team promoted v.39 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. Google Chrome 39.0.2171.65 contains a number of fixes and improvements, including 64-bit support for Mac, a number of new apps/extension APIs, lots of under the hood changes for stability and performance.

Chrome 39 will arrive through an automatic update (if you have that feature enabled). If you don’t, you can download it from Google.

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WireLurker security paper released, discusses potential next generation of OS X, iOS malware

Posted by:
Date: Friday, November 7th, 2014, 02:30
Category: iOS, News, security

trojanhorse

Not that you should be entirely paranoid about malware on your OS X and iOS devices, but a little caution couldn’t hurt.

Per Palo Alto Networks, a new paper has been published on WireLurker, a family of malware targeting both Mac OS and iOS systems for the past six months. It’s believed that WireLurker could herald in a new generation of malware on Apple’s desktop and mobile platforms given the following characteristics:
- It is only the second known malware family that attacks iOS devices through OS X via USB.

- It is the first malware to automate generation of malicious iOS applications, through binary file replacement.

- It is the first known malware that can infect installed iOS applications similar to a traditional virus.

- It is the first in-the-wild malware to install third-party applications on non-jailbroken iOS devices through enterprise provisioning.

WireLurker was used to trojanize 467 OS X applications on the Maiyadi App Store, a third-party Mac application store in China. In the past six months, these 467 infected applications were downloaded over 356,104 times and may have impacted hundreds of thousands of users.

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Security researcher finds unsaved files are automatically saved into iCloud

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, November 5th, 2014, 17:10
Category: iCloud, News, security

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This may not be what Apple intended to have happen with iCloud.

And there may be a patch coming for it posthaste.

According to Slate, security researcher Jeffrey Paul recently noticed that Apple’s default autosave is storing in-progress files—the ones you haven’t explicitly saved yet—in the cloud, not on your hard drive. Unless you decided to hit save before you start typing, or manually changed the default settings, those meeting notes, passwords, and credit card numbers you jotted down in “Untitled 17” are living in iCloud.

Although this issue seems to be a recent phenomenon, it appears that it’s been happening since at least December of 2013, according to Apple’s Knowledge Base, and it doesn’t just affect TextEdit, but also Preview, Pages, Numbers, and Keynote. Hopefully there wasn’t anything sensitive on those screenshots, spreadsheets, presentations, and documents you haven’t yet saved, or you were using other programs. Luckily, Word for Mac files don’t seem to be affected in this way.

You can turn off this surreptitious feature in Documents & Data —> Apple —> System Preferences —> iCloud —> Documents & Data, or you can save your empty file before you even start typing. But that’s not really the point. The problem is that users intuitively expect their in-progress documents to be saved locally, but these files are being stored on the Cloud instead.

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