The Apple Core: iPhone’s missing features

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Date: Tuesday, January 16th, 2007, 12:53
Category: The Apple Core
mwsf07-iphone-slide-crop.jpg

I want to start out by saying that I think that the iPhone will be wildly successful. I think that Apple will sell boat loads of them. I will definitely be buying one, at minimum for research purposes. That being said, it would be irresponsible to simply laud the device without pointing out some of it’s more serious deficiencies, and there are several of them.
I should also mention that the following are my list of missing iPhone’s missing features, so they won’t necessarily be yours.
iPhone’s missing features:
1. Third party support. Apple is making the iPhone a walled garden without allowing third party applications to be installed. Apple claims that it’s for security reasons but I think that they’ll eventually bow to public pressure and release an SDK and allow certain “blessed” applications in. Besides, there’s always the “browser hole.”
2. Browser plug-ins/Flash/Javascript. This is still up in the air, but Apple is staying mum on exactly which plug-ins the “Safari” browser will support. I think that dropping Javascript and/or Flash is a deal-breaker.
Read the rest of the story on my ZDNet Blog: The Apple Core.

mwsf07-iphone-slide-crop.jpg

I want to start out by saying that I think that the iPhone will be wildly successful. I think that Apple will sell boat loads of them. I will definitely be buying one, at minimum for research purposes. That being said, it would be irresponsible to simply laud the device without pointing out some of it’s more serious deficiencies, and there are several of them.
I should also mention that the following are my list of missing iPhone’s missing features, so they won’t necessarily be yours.
iPhone’s missing features:
1. Third party support. Apple is making the iPhone a walled garden without allowing third party applications to be installed. Apple claims that it’s for security reasons but I think that they’ll eventually bow to public pressure and release an SDK and allow certain “blessed” applications in. Besides, there’s always the “browser hole.”
2. Browser plug-ins/Flash/Javascript. This is still up in the air, but Apple is staying mum on exactly which plug-ins the “Safari” browser will support. I think that dropping Javascript and/or Flash is a deal-breaker.
Read the rest of the story on my ZDNet Blog: The Apple Core.

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