Is this the iPhone 6′s rear bezel?

Posted by:
Date: Monday, March 31st, 2014, 18:05
Category: Hardware, iPhone, Rumor

While this one lands squarely in the rumor department, someone posted what might be the first photos of a bona fide iPhone 6 to microblogging service Weibo (via Nowhereelse.fr and BGR)

It might only be the rear casing, but these photos look like they could be the real deal.

What’s your take? Any Chinese readers care to translate the on-screen text to the left of the first image? Any pixel pushers care to grok the EXIF data? Start sleuthing and post your discoveries in the comments.

New leak purporting to be the iPhone 6

iphone-6-leak-weibo-ogrady-1

iphone-6-leak-weibo-ogrady-2

Leaked iPhone 6 dimensions: definitely larger than the iPhone 5

Posted by:
Date: Saturday, March 29th, 2014, 18:55
Category: Hardware, iPhone

The good folks at Nowhereelse.fr have posted a document from a Chinese website that they think could be a schematic design for the iPhone 6. The drawing depicts a device that is 85 millimeters wide by 150 millimeters long, which would give it a display with a 5-inch (diagonal) screen.

iphone-6-schematic-ogrady

The problem with the leaked dimensions is that they don’t sync with previous rumors that we’ve seen about the upcoming iPhone 6 sporting a 4.7, 5.5, or even 5.7-inch display (or possibly, both).

Take this one with a healthy grain of salt and, as always, consider the source. Without further confirmation the drawing should be treated with skepticism and scrutiny, but if you have any theories on it (one way or the other) sound off in the comments.

Rumor department: iPhone 6 to get 5.5-inch display in fall #TAC

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, January 16th, 2014, 17:58
Category: Apple, iPhone

In probably my favorite post of the week, Apple’s finally rumored to be exploring large displays for the iPhone 6, tentative due in the fall. Look, everyone likes to have a phone that will run al day on a charge but it’s foolish to think that Apple’s not losing customers that want larger screens to Sammy. Sure, many iPhone owners also have iPads (I’d venture to say that it’s a high percentage) which should satisfy their need for a larger screen, but many don’t and they’re not cool with a puny 4-inch iPhone.

Research firm DisplaySearch reports in their new Quarterly Worldwide FPD Shipment and Forecast Report reports that Apple is likely to launch two new versions of next-generation iPhone with two larger display options. According to the report Apple will launch a 4.7-inch model with 1600×900 resolution, 386ppi and LTPS TFT LCD display technology. A larger version of the “iPhone 6″ could pack a 5.5-inch display with 1920×1080 resolution at 401 PPI utilizing the same display technology.

The X factor here is developers. They’re going to need to re-compile their apps for a fourth screen size and Apple will have to tell them about it by WWDC (think June-ish) at the latest.

The good news is that Apple is exploring two iPhone screen sizes (4.7 and 5.5-inches) so that there will be an option for both small and large hands. (Read more at The Apple Core).

What size iPhone 6 would you buy? Is 4-inches a deal breaker?

How Apple can protect kids against predatory IAPs #TAC

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, January 16th, 2014, 16:29
Category: App Store, Apple

Tom’s under the weather, so I wanted to pitch in and cross-post a few of my ZDNet posts. In this one I discuss an issue that’s near and dear to my heart. My kids have accidentally purchased lots of In-App Purchases (IAPs) from the App Store because of Apple’s 15-minute no password window and nefarious developers that riddle free apps with ads and coerce kids into clicking through to bogus add-on purchases in Freemium apps.

Here are the suggestions I posted on The Apple Core:

  1. Offer the ability to require a password for every transaction.
  2. Offer the option to require a password for free downloads.
  3. Actively track the amount of refund requests in apps targeting kids and set a low threshold for penalizing developers that prey on young users with IAPs. (i.e. if your app generated more than 10 refunds in a day your App comes off the App Store for a day, and so on…)
  4. iTunes Store emails should be sent in real time as purchases occur.
  5. Offer the option to send an SMS or push notification to the account owner’s iPhone or iPad immediately after a purchase
  6. Make refunds easier to requests. Currently you can only request a refund within the desktop version of iTunes, and it’s extremely difficult to find
  7. Add more detail to IAPs in Recent Purchases UI by naming the host app in which the IAP occurred

The problem is that Apple took in $10 billion in revenue from the App Store in 2013, so there’s a strong disincentive to them doing anything that curbs its ferocious rate of sales. (Read more at ZDNet).

What’s your take?

PPUG November 9, 2013 — Wrap-up, links and presentation

Posted by:
Date: Saturday, November 23rd, 2013, 20:45
Category: Meetup, PPUG, User Group

ppug-meeting-2013-1109 001

Last weekend’s PPUG meeting was a resounding success!

In case you missed it, here are links to the products that Jason talked about:

Download Jason’s presentation in both Keynote or PDF formats.

Rob Parker talked about the following;

Youngmoo Kim talked about:

We hope that you can make it to our next meeting.

PPUG Meets in Philadelphia this Saturday, November 9

Posted by:
Date: Friday, November 8th, 2013, 20:28
Category: Meetup, User Group

http://thescene.s3.amazonaws.com/pics/bar/2/51481/profile/1205061797294_272.jpgJoin us for a spectacular autumnal meeting on Saturday, November 9, 2013 at noon.

The Philadelphia PowerBook Users Group (PPUG) will hold its pre-holiday festival meeting from 12 noon to 3 p.m. at the beautiful Manayunk Brewing Company. We usually have lunch (and a brew) while we talk mobile computing.  We will need to leave the Brewery promptly by 3pm because another group will be using the room.  So that means we will get started promptly at noon.

I’ll be on hand with PPUG co-founders Rob Parker, Bob Snow and Youngmoo Kim to talk about latest developments in mobile computing, including new Macs, iPads, iPhones, and the latest Apple developments right up to the date of the meeting.  Topics will include new iPhones, iOS 7, Mavericks, the new iPads, and Frax, the amazing new app Kai Krause and company.

Come hear special presentations from our panel and some fabulous demos as well. Additionally, we have lots of give aways courtesy of and provided by Sandy Foderick of Apple User Group Resources. Of course we’ll have a healthy serving of Q&A.

Join us for a great meeting, it’s free and open to you and your guests. Feel free to bring items to sell or swap as well.

OUR MEETING PLACE:

Manayunk Brewing Company
4120 Main Street
Philadelphia, PA 19127
215.482.8220

If you are part of a Mac User Group, then forward this announcement to your membership.  All are welcome!

 

Why the Mac (still) beats the PC

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, October 8th, 2013, 08:25
Category: Apple, Opinion

Christopher Laincz, Ph.D., is director of the LeBow Ph.D. Program at Drexel University, and associate professor in LeBow’s Department of Economics and International BusinessI’m publishing this guest blog by Dr. Christopher Laincz, because I couldn’t agree more with his opinions. If you don’t agree, be sure to read the pro-PC counter-point article by his colleague Mark Eyerly and sound off in the comments below.

I find myself in a strange town, and I want a cup of coffee. I see a Starbucks and some local dive. I choose Starbucks.

Here’s why: When you walk into Starbucks, you know exactly what you’re getting; and, they’ll customize it to your taste. If they make an error, they fix it immediately. I expect a good experience right from the start.

On the other hand, the local dive might prove great, but it might serve bug-infested sludge.

Perhaps you’re thinking, “risking a dollar or so on the local dive’s coffee is no big deal.” Sure. But when it comes to computers, it’s much riskier. You could easily spend $1,500 on some crappy PC. Perhaps for an extra $500, you could take home a (beautiful and better-designed) Mac with similar specs.

Why do I spend more on a Mac? Because Macs are better. In fact, the quality-adjusted price actually makes the Mac the better deal. PCs can be made in any Joe’s garage – and too frequently are – hence the hardware quality is a crapshoot. The Windows environment is fraught with holes and issues. Ever try to get service help for your PC? Ugh.

Furthermore, I do not need or appreciate my computer warning me at every turn about this risk or that issue. Just fix it, dammit! I’m busy with my own work. I don’t have time to invest in searching for the answers to every PC/Windows security or design flaw that crops up.

This isn’t a problem I encounter on my Mac. Apple takes care of maintenance and quality-control, so I am willing to pay for that. Buy a PC, and the maintenance and quality-control risks are on you. You may have paid less for the hardware up front, but over time you’ll pay with time, money and frustration to keep the thing functioning and not destroying your own tireless efforts.

Mac products stay way ahead of the Windows environment in terms of innovation and user-friendliness. I blame the PC/Windows marriage from hell.

The Justice Department brought an anti-trust suit against Microsoft for abusing its market power to kill off Netscape (which it did successfully). One of the punitive options in front of the Justice Department was to break Microsoft up into two companies: operating system (Windows) and software (MS Office).

Had the Justice Department gone with that option, the software would have been thrown into a more competitive environment. But it didn’t, and as a result the Office Suite has not evolved much.

Some complain that Apple excludes other products from seamless integration with its own. Sure, that may be true, but for me it isn’t a problem.

After falling in love with my 4-year-old MacBook Pro (which I’m using right now), I got a Mac desktop for my home, another for the office, and I just added the iPhone.

Digital bliss.

Christopher Laincz, Ph.D., is director of the LeBow Ph.D. Program at Drexel University, and associate professor in LeBow’s Department of Economics and International Business. He’s actually pretty down-to-earth for a Mac-toting academic.

Four privacy settings you should enable in iOS 7 immediately

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, September 19th, 2013, 00:11
Category: iOS, iPad, iPhone, privacy

Data backed up? Check.

iOS 7 installed? Check.

Data restored? Check.

Life is good and time to fire up your favorite iTunes Radio station, right?

Not so fast.

Before diving into the beautiful, parallaxy, candy-colored world that is iOS 7, you need to adjust your privacy settings on your iPhone or iPad. If you like your Privacy, that is. Installing iOS 7 is pretty easy and, even if you don’t back up your data ahead of time, it will usually put everything back right where it belongs.

Simple, right?

Well yes, that’s how iOS 7 is designed to work. But don’t let Apple’s thin Helvetica Neue and and serene, dynamic wallpapers lull you into complacency. A whole number iOS upgrade is a big deal and it resets a bunch of your settings and adds privacy and security settings that you should be aware of.

Apple hides its System Services settings all the way down at the bottom of the Privacy > Location Services panel. If you’ve owned your iPhone for more than a few months you’ll have dozens (possibly over one hundred) apps listed on this screen, making it a very long scroll. If you actually make it to the bottom of the list (most people don’t) you’ll see the fabled System Services setting and the explanation of what that little purple arrow icons means.

Again, the path is Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services:

Privacy settings you should enable in iOS 7 immediately - Jason O'Grady

Learn this screen and commit the meanings of the three little arrow icons to memory. Then notice when they appear in the top right of your iOS menu bar and come back to Settings > Privacy > Location Services to see which apps are using your location data. Audit this screen frequently to disable location access for apps that don’t need it.

Then touch System Services to reveal the most important privacy settings on your iPhone or iPad.

  • Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services

Privacy settings you should enable in iOS 7 immediately - Jason O'Grady

I recommend turning OFF the following:

  • Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services > Diagnostics & Usage
  • Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services > Location-Based iAds
  • Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services > Frequent Locations

Diagnostics & Usage

This setting monitors everything you do on your iPhone and “anonymously” sends it to Apple for “improving iOS.” Whatever. It’s just like when all the major software companies changed their install screens from “send usage data?” to “customer experience program” or some such nonsense. If you leave the “Diagnostics & Usage” option on, you’re giving Apple permission to monitor and record everything you do on your device.

Location-Based iAds

iAds created it’s own privacy uproar in June 2010 when a 45-page update to Apple’s privacy policywhich detailed how your location information could be used to allow the company – and their “partners and licensees” – to “collect, use, and share precise location data, including the real-time geographic location of your Apple computer or device.” The privacy policy has been toned down quite a bit since then and Apple posted a knowledge base article titled “How to opt out of interest-based ads from the iAd network.” I turn this off and am happy with “less relevant” ads being shown.

Frequent Locations

Frequent Locations is equally bad, if not more so. There was a big stir about this when iOS 7 beta 5 was released, and the data it captures about your whereabouts can be downright creepy. For many it brought back memories of the Locationgate fiasco from iOS 4 in April 2011 when a database of Wi-Fi hotspots and cell towers around your current location known as “Consolidated.db” was discovered on iOS 4 devices — and the computers they’re backed up to. Note that the iPhone 4 (and earlier) do not support the “Frequent Locations” feature in iOS 7.

Advertising

Next navigate to the iOS Advertising Privacy settings (Settings > Privacy > Advertising).

Here, you should do three things:

  1. Turn ON “Limit Ad Tracking”
  2. Touch “Reset Advertising Identifier” (which I wrote about in January 2013), and
  3. Touch “Learn More” and learn about what an “Advertising Identifier” is

Privacy settings you should enable in iOS 7 immediately - Jason O'Grady

Safari

Navigate to the iOS Safari Settings (Settings > Safari) turn on the following:

  • Block Pop-ups
  • Do Not Track*
  • Block Cookies is set to “From third parties and advertisers”
  • Fraudulent Website Warning

*Apple’s one of the few companies that still supports the aging Do Not Track standard in its mobile Web browser. Even if it is considered dead (my ZDNet colleague Ed Bott called it “worse than a miserable failure,”) I turn it on anyway, for the few web servers that actually respect it.

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While you’re at it it doesn’t hurt to touch “Clear History” and “Clear Cookies and Data” now and again.

If you found this article useful or important, please Share and Like it on Facebook, Google+ or your social network of choice. Please help get the word out about these important settings.

Appearance: PPUG Saturday in Philadelphia (Withings WS-50 preview)

Posted by:
Date: Friday, March 29th, 2013, 09:28
Category: Accessory, PPUG, User Group, Wearables

Withings WS-50 Wi-Fi scale

I’ll be presenting at the Philadelphia PowerBook User Group (PPUG) on Saturday, March 30, 2013 from 12 noon to 3 p.m. PPUG is the first dedicated PowerBook User Group (PPUG) in the United States and was founded in 1999.

We meet at the Manayunk Brewing Company along the beautiful Schuylkill River in Philadelphia, PA and our meetings is open to all. We usually have lunch (or a brew) while we talk mobile computing.

We’ve got a big slate to present.

I’m going to present the latest in wearable fitness computers, including the Jawbone Up band, the BodyMedia FIT LINK and their associated iOS apps. I’m also giving an exclusive demonstration of the Withings WS-50 Smart Body Analyzer. It’s your chance to preview the new Wi-Fi scale that measures weight, body composition, heart rate, and air quality before it starts shipping in mid-April.

Rob Parker will do a roundup of the latest gadgets in the ParkerDigital stable, including the Pebble watch, Nike+ Fuel Band, FitBit One, Mophie Juice Pack Air for iPhone 5 and some iPad mini cases. Apple Distinguished Educator Youngmoo Kim will give a presentation about issues and tricks he’s encountered doing presentations wirelessly using AirPlay. He’ll be presenting using an Apple TV connected to a BenQ 761 projector.

Join us for a great meeting, it’s free and open to you and your guests. Feel free to bring items to sell or swap as well.

Manayunk Brewing Company

4120 Main Street

Philadelphia, PA 19127

215.482.8220

PowerPage Podcast Episode 159 – iOS 6 upstages Retina MacBook Pro

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, June 14th, 2012, 12:53
Category: Podcast

PowerPage Podcast 2012 logoPowerPage Podcast Episode 159 (“iOS 6 upstages Retina MacBook Pro”) is now available for your listening pleasure:

In this episode Rob Parker and I discuss how iOS 6 may have stolen the thunder from Apple’s new Retina MacBook Pro, Ivy Bridge MacBook Air, and all the WWDC announcements for that matter. Jason discloses how you can get over 100 new emoji icons and we wrap the podcast with “What’s on your kit?”

Here’s what’s on our kit this week:

Jason

  • Algoriddim vjay ($9.99, App Store) – Mind-blowing video mixer for iPad from the creators of djay, the best DJ app on iOS.
  • The Indy ($179) – This distressed leather iPad shoulder bag is both functional and gorgeous (and it’s made in the U.S.A.)
  • WiebeTech UltraDock v5 ($249) - Access, set up, diagnose or repair any raw 2.5 or 3.5-inch SATA drive via FireWire, USB or eSATA.
  • FreeSpace ($0.99, Mac App Store) - Free drive space monitor for your OS X menu bar, with one click eject. Perfect for cramped SSDs.

Rob

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