Skype updated to version 5.3.60.1093, adds fixes

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Date: Friday, September 2nd, 2011, 03:16
Category: News, Software

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On Thursday, version 5.3.60.1093 of the Skype VoIP application was released. The new version, a 22.5 megabyte download, offers the following fixes and changes:

– Sometimes Skype crashed during video calls.

– Fixes a problem in Norwegian localization which could lead to client freeze.

Skype 5.3.60.1093 is available for free and requires Mac OS X 10.5.8 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know.

OWC releases firmware updater for SandForce-based solid state drives

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Date: Thursday, September 1st, 2011, 09:48
Category: hard drive, News, Software

Accessory outfitter Other World Computing announced today the release of its Apple/Mac compatible firmware updater for SandForce-Driven Solid State Drives. The fully Mac bootable updater is freely available from OWC for use exclusively with select OWC Mercury Solid State Drive models manufactured since January 2010. This new Mac compatible firmware updater is in addition to firmware update support OWC previously made available for Macintosh computers via the use of Boot Camp, as well as for PCs running the Windows OS.

To run the updater, Mac users only need to download the updater from OWC’s site, obtain and burn a DVD, and then boot from that DVD to launch an easy to use, point and click GUI for installing the latest firmware revision to their OWC Mercury SSD.

If you’ve tried the updater and have any feedback to offer, please let us know via the comments and thank you.

Apple releases Digital Camera Raw Compatibility Update 3.8, adds support for new camera formats

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Date: Thursday, September 1st, 2011, 04:33
Category: News, Software

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Late Wednesday, Apple posted its Digital Camera Raw Compatibility Update 3.8, an update designed to extend RAW image compatibility for the Aperture 3 and iPhoto ’09 applications.

The update, a 6.9 megabyte download, adds support for the following cameras:

– Konica Minolta DiMAGE A200

– Olympus PEN E-P3

– Panasonic LUMIX DMC-G3

– Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF3

– Samsung NX11

– Samsung NX100

– Sony Alpha NEX-C3

– Sony Alpha SLT-A35

The update requires Mac OS X 10.5.8 or later to install and run and is also available via Mac OS X’s built-in Software Update feature.

If you’ve tried the new Digital Camera RAW update and noticed any changes, please let us know how it went.

Apple loses iPhone 5 prototype, manages to locate it within days

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Date: Thursday, September 1st, 2011, 03:31
Category: iPhone, News

Ok, this is odd.

Remember when an Apple employee lost an iPhone 4 prototype in a bar last year and the company was, well, mildly upset regarding the aftermath?

It’s happened again.

In a bizarre repeat of a high-profile incident last year, an Apple employee once again appears to have lost an unreleased iPhone in a bar.

Per CNET, the errant iPhone, which went missing in San Francisco’s Mission district in late July, sparked a scramble by Apple security to recover the device over the next few days, according to a source familiar with the investigation.

Last year, an iPhone 4 prototype was bought by a gadget blog that paid US$5,000 in cash. This year’s lost phone seems to have taken a more mundane path: it was taken from a Mexican restaurant and bar and may have been sold on Craigslist for US$200. Still unclear are details about the device, what version of the iOS operating system it was running, and what it looks like.

Apple declined to comment after being contacted this morning. A spokesman for the San Francisco Police Department said the company did not file a police report based on the loss at the bar. Craigslist did not respond to requests for comment.

A day or two after the phone was lost at San Francisco’s Cava 22, which describes itself as a “tequila lounge” that also serves lime-marinated shrimp ceviche, Apple representatives contacted San Francisco police, saying the device was priceless and the company was desperate to secure its safe return, the source said.

Apple electronically traced the phone to a two-floor, single-family home in San Francisco’s Bernal Heights neighborhood, according to the source. When San Francisco police and Apple’s investigators visited the house, they spoke with a man in his twenties who acknowledged being at Cava 22 on the night the device went missing. But he denied knowing anything about the phone. The man gave police permission to search the house, and they found nothing, the source said. Before leaving the house, the Apple employees offered the man money for the phone no questions asked, the source said, adding that the man continued to deny he had knowledge of the phone.

In an interview this afternoon, Jose Valle told CNET that neither the police nor Apple security ever contacted him. Valle, who owns the bar with his family, said however does he remember a man calling multiple times about a lost iPhone about a month ago. He told the man he would call him back if he ever found the phone.
“I guess I have to make my drinks a little less strong,” Valle said.

After last year’s embarrassing loss, Apple reportedly has taken extraordinary steps to protect its prototype devices from leaks. Next-generation iPhones are sent to carriers for testing “inside locked and sealed boxes so that the carriers can carry out checks on their network compatibility in their labs,” according to the Guardian.

Apple developers have been given new iPhones with an upgraded processor — the one that is used in the iPad 2 and is expected to appear in the next-generation iPhone. But the device “is virtually identical to the iPhone 4, and there is no way anyone can tell it’s not an iPhone 4 based on the phone’s exterior,” according to a report at 9to5Mac.com. Even last year’s prototype was enclosed in a case designed to make it look like an iPhone 3GS.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

SpamSieve updated to 2.8.7

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Date: Thursday, September 1st, 2011, 03:35
Category: News, Software

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Michael Tsai’s must-have shareware program, SpamSieve, has just been updated to version 2.8.7. The new version, an 8.5 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and improvements, as listed here.

SpamSieve is available for a US$30 registration fee and requires Mac OS X 10.4 or later to run. The new version can either be downloaded directly from the web site or brought up to the current version via the program’s built-in update feature.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, let us know in the comments.

Mozilla releases Firefox 6.0.1 update

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Date: Wednesday, August 31st, 2011, 10:52
Category: News, Software

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Late Sunday, Mozilla.org released version 6.0.1 of its Firefox web browser. The new version stands as an 28.1 megabyte download offered the following change:

– Revoked the root certificate for DigiNotar due to fraudulent SSL certificate issuance (see bug 682927 and the security advisory).

Firefox 6.0.1 requires an Intel-based Mac and Mac OS X 10.5 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback, let us know.

Rumor: Apple to add remote diagnostic tool in iOS 5.0

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Date: Wednesday, August 31st, 2011, 05:19
Category: iPhone, Rumor

It’s always nifty when you can get something fixed remotely.

Per the cool cats at HardMac, Apple has allegedly internally announced to its employees that the new remote diagnostic tool has been completed. Presumably, these features could arrive with this fall’s release of iOS 5, the next major upgrade to Apple’s mobile operating system.

The entirely online system will be triggered by a special URL sent via e-mail or entered manually. When a user visits the website and agrees, Mobile Safari will conduct internal checks of the system and send that data to Apple’s servers.

To ensure user privacy, the only personal data that will be sent to Apple will include its unique identifier, or UDID, as well as the name of the owner, the report said.

The list of information to be shared by the diagnostic system reportedly includes:
Battery health, including current charge level, amount of time since the last charge, minimum level to which the battery was discharged, iOS version installed and whether the handset was turned off normally the last time.

Apple’s iOS 5 for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch is set to be released this fall. It will pack more than 200 new user features, including Notification Center, iMessage, and Newsstand.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Data Rescue updated to 3.2.1, adds Lion compatibility, other features

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Date: Tuesday, August 30th, 2011, 11:21
Category: News, Software

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On Tuesday, Data Rescue 3, Prosoft Engineering’s data rescue and recovery program, was updated to version 3.2.1. The new version, a 13.6 megabyte download, features the following fixes and changes:

– Added support for recovering Address Book’s database.

– Added suggested locations when selecting a recovery destination folder.

– Improved compatibility with Mac OS X 10.7.

– Improved VoiceOver compatibility.

– Fixed Photoshop PSDs with bit-depths other than 8 not recovering fully.

– Fixed incorrect sorting of scans after one was deleted.

– Fixed permissions on FileIQ .agfm files.

– Fixed total size calculation when Time Machine folders were marked.

– Fixed various crashes related to detecting bad drives.

– Fixed crash when Expert prefs were toggled after selecting Clone.

– Added RAID set partitions to device list.

Data Rescue 3.2.1 retails for US$99 and requires Mac OS X 10.4.11 or later to install and run.

Sprint to hold media event on October 7, may announce iPhone carrier partnership

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Date: Tuesday, August 30th, 2011, 07:44
Category: iPhone, News

The good news is that Sprint looks more likely to become a U.S. iPhone carrier.

The bad news is that Candace Bergen is probably sitting around wondering if they’ll call and ask her to sponsor them 20 years after the fact…

Per Electronista, the telephone carrier sent out invitations on Monday for a Strategy Update event on October 7. The New York City event has few details and will have presentations from executives followed by a question-and-answer session. Topics for the gathering weren’t given out, although it’s implied that it’s a broader corporate move.

The time slot immediately raises suspicion as it dovetails with one rumored iPhone 5 release date as well as a general consensus that Apple is aiming for the first half of that month. At the same time, however, Sprint has hinted at a major rethink of its 4G strategy for the end of the year and may simply use the scheduling to make a push into LTE. Its newly minted LightSquared deal directly opens the possibility of a switch from WiMAX to LTE.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Microsoft VP highlights Windows 8 interface changes, emphasizes upcoming Ribbon features

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Date: Tuesday, August 30th, 2011, 04:18
Category: iOS, News, Software

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If Mac OS X 10.7 (“Lion”) was starting to look like Windows 7 (or vice versa), this might be reassuring.

Per a blog entry by Steven Sinofsky, Microsoft’s president of its Windows Division, indicates that one key element of Windows 8 will take the new release in a very different direction than Apple’s outline for Mac OS X.

Sinofsky detailed his thinking behind changes planned for Windows Explorer, which is roughly analogous to Mac OS X’s Finder.

The Windows file system manager originally appeared as “MS DOS Executive,” which exposed DOS commands in a graphical environment with little similarity to the icon-centric Mac desktop.

As Windows began to grow in popularity, Microsoft created an embellished graphical representation of the file system with File Manager. Then, as web browsing became popular, Microsoft brought a browser-like interface to the file system, renaming File Manager as Windows Explorer, complete with a URL-like address bar and prominent back button.

Microsoft has incrementally incorporated Mac-like interface elements in Windows Explorer, with icon-centric file browsing that links documents to their preferred application. Particularly since the release of Mac OS X, Microsoft has incorporated a similar user environment focus that presents the user’s documents, pictures, music and videos rather than just a raw window into the root file system.

Microsoft’s biggest changes in Windows 8 will be an Office-like Ribbon that presents all the major functions in a tall, window-wide control bar. This marks a radical change in thinking compared to Apple’s increasingly minimalistic interface in the Finder, which limits the default buttons to a grouping of view options, a new sorting feature in Mac OS X Lion, a Quick View button, an Action button, and a search field.



Microsoft’s Windows 8 Explorer presents 19 visible buttons in five categories, and that’s just the Home tab. The Ribbon also supplies four other tabs, which function similar to the Mac’s main Menu Bar. Sinofsky explains, “The Home tab is the heart of our new, much more streamlined Explorer experience. The commands that make up 84% of what customers do in Explorer are now all available on this one tab.”

Outside of the graphical interface, Microsoft’s design goals for Windows 8 also mark a new era of computing centered around mobile devices such as tablets. Existing Windows 7 apps won’t run on future ARM-based tablets, but a new secondary environment of web-based apps will, something Microsoft hopes will enable Windows to remain relevant even as the conventional PC market has plateaued and begun to shrink globally.

Apple’s design direction for Mac OS X has opted to incorporate a variety of design elements originally created for iPad, including a simplified, window-less Full Screen mode for apps; limited and simplified control buttons in toolbars; an increasing use of touchpad gestures; and a new security model that encapsulates apps and their documents in a private sandbox.

Apple’s iOS originally appeared on the iPhone without any “file browser,” and even the latest version works hard to avoid any exposure of the underlying file system, despite supporting document-centric apps like iWork. Apps on iOS simply can not present a global view of the underlying filesystem, because all they can see is their own sandbox.

Apple’s iCloud similarly reduces the exposure of file system, replacing MobileMe’s iDisk with a new Documents and Data feature that secures an app’s files and data from access by malware while making the user’s files (and any changes) easier to manage across various devices.

Future versions of Mac OS X will likely continue along the same path, focusing upon self contained apps that create files, rather than a wide open file system (and the security issues related with having any piece of user-level software capable of accessing or wiping out any files in the local user folder).

Yes, the Ribbon shall rule the day after you boot up your Windows partiion either via Boot Camp or your virtualization app of choice.

All hail the Ribbon!!!