Mozilla releases Firefox 3.6.2 update

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010, 04:33
Category: Software

elfirefox

On Tuesday, Mozilla.org released the long-awaited 3.6.2 version of its Firefox web browser.
The new version, an 18.6 megabyte download, sports the following fixes and changes:

- Fixed a critical security issue that could potentially allow remote code execution (see bug 552216).
- Fixed several additional security issues.
- Fixed several stability issues.

Firefox 3.6.2 is available in more than 70 different languages and requires a G3, G4, G5 or Intel-based Mac, Mac OS X 10.4 or later and 128MB of RAM to install and run.

If you’ve snagged the new version and have any feedback to offer about it, let us know in the comments.

Apple Posts Second Private Mac OS X 10.6.3 Developer Beta, Final Release Seems Imminent

Posted by:
Date: Friday, March 19th, 2010, 04:29
Category: News

snowleopard

Late Thursday Apple posted the second private beta of its Mac OS X 10.6.3 update in as many days, a move that suggests that the software is rapidly approaching a release candidate.

The latest pre-release carries build number 10D572, just one complete compile removed from build 10D571, which was seeded to software developers on Tuesday.

Apple typically seeds external betas of Mac OS X updates at such a rapid frequency only when the software is entering a final candidate stage, or if a serious and potentially-hazardous glitch was discovered with the preceding build.

Per AppleInsider, sources close to the story have said that Apple is now asking developers to focus their testing efforts around Mail, images, security certificates and photos, in addition to graphics drivers and QuickTime, both of which have remained a priority throughout the better part of the beta program.

An emphasis on fonts and iCal that accompanied Tuesday’s beta was reportedly dropped with the distribution of build 10D572. Meanwhile, an issue with recurring events in iCal’s interaction with Exchange server was repaired.

The 10.6.3 update is also said to include an update to QuickTime X that improves security and compatibility while also enhancing overall reliability of the media software.

The update will also include tweaks that enhance the performance of Apple’s 64-bit Logic pro audio suite and deliver better compatibility with third-party printers and OpenGL-grounded applications.

Other fixes baked into the release target issues with mail messages displaying the incorrect background color and problems copying files to a shared Windows volume.

The latest distributions weigh in at just shy of 790MB in Combo Update form and 725MB as a barebones Delta image.

If you’ve played with the build and have any comments about it, please let us know.

Suburban Philadelphia School District Denies Accusation of Spying on Students with MacBook Cameras

Posted by:
Date: Friday, February 19th, 2010, 05:18
Category: Legal, MacBook, News

143393-09macbook386_original

A suburban Philadelphia school district has denied it spied on students by remotely activating the cameras on their school-issued MacBook notebooks.

Per Macworld UK, in a statement released late on Thursday, Christopher McGinley, the superintendent of Lower Merion School District of Ardmore, Pa., admitted that the MacBooks’ cameras could be turned on without the user’s knowledge, but said that the functionality was part of a security feature.

“Laptops are a frequent target for theft in schools and off-school property,” said McGinley. “The security feature was installed to help locate a laptop in the event it was reported lost, missing or stolen so that the laptop could be returned to the student.” When switched on, the feature was limited to taking snapshots of whomever was using the notebook and capturing the computer’s current screen.

Laptop cameras have only been activated for that purpose, McGinley continued. “The District has not used the tracking feature or web cam for any other purpose or in any other manner whatsoever,” he said.

This Tuesday, a high school student and his parents sued the district, claiming that the student’s MacBook had been used to spy on him in his home. According to the lawsuit, Michael and Holly Robbins of Penn Valley, Pa., said they first found out about the alleged spying last November after their son Blake was accused by a Harriton High School official of “improper behavior in his home” and shown a photograph taken by his laptop.

Doug Young, a spokesman for the school district, declined to answer questions as to whether Blake Robbins’ computer camera had been activated, and if so, under what circumstances. “I can’t speak to the lawsuit,” Young said.

The lawsuit speaks for itself, said Kevin Bankston, a senior staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation. “This is utterly shocking, and a blatant violation of [the students'] constitutional rights,” Bankston said Thursday, citing the Fourth Amendment after reviewing the Robbins’ complaint. “The school district would have no more right to [use the laptop's webcam] than to install secret listening devices in the textbooks that they issued students.”

Bankston suggested that students should tape over the lens of their laptops’ cameras when not in use.

McGinley confirmed that the district had disabled the camera activation feature on Thursday, and would not switch it back on without the written consent of students and families. The Robbins’ lawsuit alleged that the district had not told students or their families of the activation feature when it handed out the MacBooks. All 2,300 students at the district’s two high schools have been given notebooks.

The district intends to contest the lawsuit, said Young.

Mark Haltzman of the law firm Lamm Rubenstone, and the Robbins’ attorney, did not return a call for comment on Thursday.

The Robbins family has asked for unspecified compensatory and punitive damages, and requested that the case be granted class-action status so other students in the district can join the suit.

Adobe Reader 9.3.1 Out the Door

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, February 17th, 2010, 03:27
Category: News, Software

readerlogo

Late Tuesday, Adobe released version 9.3.1 of Acrobat Reader, the company’s Portable Document Format reader and creation utility.

Adobe Systems has updated Reader to version 9.3.1 and the update is available through the Adobe Updater application or for download through Adobe’s Web site.

The new versions address a number of customer workflow issues, security vulnerabilities, and offer additional stability.

Adobe Reader 9.3.1 requires Mac OS X 10.4 or later to install and run and is available for free.

Apple Releases iPhone OS 3.1.3 Update for iPhone, iPod Touch

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010, 06:18
Category: iPhone, iPod Touch, Software

3gs.jpg

Late Tuesday, Apple released version 3.1.3 of its iPhone OS firmware. The update, which weighs in at over 200 megabytes and can be downloaded by attaching your iPhone or iPod touch to your Mac or PC, clicking the device in iTunes, then clicking the “Check for Update” button, adds the following fixes and changes:

- Improves accuracy of reported battery level on iPhone 3GS.
- Resolves issue where third-party apps would not launch in some instances.
- Fixes bug that may cause an app to crash when using the Japanese Kana keyboard.
- Full list of security updates listed here.

If you’ve installed iPhone OS 3.1.3 and noticed any changes, please let us know.

Details Emerge for Expected Mac OS X 10.6.3 Changes

Posted by:
Date: Friday, January 22nd, 2010, 15:28
Category: News, Software

snowleopard

Mac OS X 10.6.3 will include significant enhancements to QuickTime X while also focusing on printing and Logic performance.

Per AppleInsider, sources close to the story have stated that build 10D538, which arrived roughly two weeks after the company issued build 10D522, included support for OpenGL 3.0 as well as an update to QuickTime X that, when finalized, will improve security and compatibility while simultaneously enhancing overall reliability. The release will also include tweaks that aim to enhance the performance of Apple’s 64-bit Logic pro audio suite. Other planned improvements include better compatibility with third-party printers and OpenGL-grounded applications, those same people say.

In addition to those areas, Apple is reportedly asking developers to focus their evaluation efforts on a few other core system components, such as AirPort, VoiceOver and graphics drivers.

A single issue related to photo albums viewed via the company’s Front Row media center software is said to be plaguing the latest beta.

The 665+ megabyte release is expected to be made public sometime in the next six weeks.

Adobe Releases Acrobat, Acrobate Reader 9.3 Updates

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, January 13th, 2010, 05:00
Category: News

readerlogo

Last Friday, Adobe released version 9.3 of Acrobat and Acrobat Reader, the company’s Portable Document Format reader and creation utility.

Adobe Systems has updated Acrobat and Reader to version 9.3. Both updates are available through the Adobe Updater application or for download through Adobe’s Web site.

The new versions address a number of customer workflow issues, security vulnerabilities, and offer additional stability.

Both Adobe Reader 9.3 and Adobe Acrobat 9.3 require Mac OS X 10.4 or later to install and run. Adobe Reader 9.3 is available for free while Adobe Acrobat 9.3 retails for US$299.

Mozilla Releases Firefox 3.5.6 Update

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, December 16th, 2009, 07:13
Category: Software

elfirefox

On Wednesday, Mozilla.org released version 3.5.6 of its Firefox web browser.
The new version, a 17.6 megabyte download, sports the following fixes and changes:

- Fixed several security issues.
- Fixed several stability issues.

Firefox 3.5.6 is available in more than 70 different languages and requires a G3, G4, G5 or Intel-based Mac, Mac OS X 10.4 or later and 128MB of RAM to install and run.

If you’ve snagged the new version and have any feedback to offer about it, let us know in the comments.

Airport Security Destroys Woman’s MacBook, Offers to Make Amends

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, December 15th, 2009, 06:03
Category: MacBook

If I ever thought the TSA people were knuckleheads, they’ve just been put to shame.

Engadget has the story of overzealous Israeli airport security officers stopping American attorney Lily Sussman, asking her a volley of questions, taking issue with her answers and placing six bullets into her MacBook before allowing her into the country. The full course of the event is described over on her blog and the young lady has been offered compensation, though this leads to one central point: back up your data.

15dec9ihavsf35

If you have any similar airport security horror stories of your own, please let us know.

Camino 2.0.1 Released

Posted by:
Date: Monday, December 7th, 2009, 07:35
Category: Software

caminologo.jpg

Late Wednesday, the Camino Project released version 2.0.1 of Camino, its free, open source web browser.
The new version, a 15.9 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:

- Upgraded to version 1.9.0.16 of the Mozilla Gecko rendering engine, which includes several critical security and stability fixes.
- The Help menu will once again contain the search field in non-English localizations on Mac OS X 10.6.
- The Camino Crash Reporter will now offer to send your email address with your crash report to allow the Camino developers to contact you for more information about your crash.
- Clicking on warning or error text in a certificate no longer causes the text to change colors.
- Improved ad-blocking.

Camino requires Mac OS X 10.4 or later to run.

If you’ve tried the new version of Camino and have any kind of feedback about it, let us know.